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GOP caught lying again in attempt to hold power
Published on October 2, 2006 By Sean Conners aka SConn1 In War on Terror
Recently, Conservative journalists and bloggers have been making up more lies about ex president Clinton. As i've stated before, i'm not a democrat (i'm a libertarian by party, but don't agree withthem all the time either) but I believe it's a shame what is being done to a pretty good President who despite what the radical right wing wants everyone to believe, had a successful Presidency.

The claim has been made (again) that Bill Clinton "cut and ran" from Somalia after the infamous "black hawk down" incident.

Once again, they are lying.

Here's what was said, at the time...

GOP Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson, speech on the Senate floor October 6, 1993


I supported our original mission, which was humanitarian in nature and limited in scope. I can no longer support a continued United States presence in Somalia because the nature of the mission is now unrealistic and because the scope of our mission is now limitless. . . . Mr. President, it is no small feat for a superpower to accept setback on the world stage, but a step backward is sometimes the wisest course. I believe that withdrawal is now the more prudent option.
GOP Sen. Dirk Kempthorne, speech on the Senate floor, October 6, 1993


Mr. President, the mission is accomplished in Somalia. The humanitarian aid has been delivered to those who were starving. The mission is not nation building, which is what now is being foisted upon the American people. The United States has no interest in the civil war in Somalia and as this young soldier told me, if the Somalis are now healthy enough to be fighting us, then it is absolutely time that we go home. . . It is time for the Senate of the United States to get on with the debate, to get on with the vote, and to get the American troops home.GOP Minority Leader Sen. Robert Dole, Senate speech, October 5, 1993


I think it is clear to say from the meeting we had earlier with--I do not know how many Members were there--45, 50 Senators and half the House of Representatives, that the administration is going to be under great pressure to bring the actions in Somalia to a close. . . . GOP Sen. Jesse Helms, Senate floor speech October 6, 1993:


All of which means that I support the able Senator from West Virginia--who, by the way, was born in North Carolina--Senator Robert C. Byrd, and others in efforts to bring an end to this tragic situation. The United States did its best to deliver aid and assistance to the victims of chaos in Somalia as promised by George Bush last December.

But now we find ourselves involved there in a brutal war, in an urban environment, with the hands of our young soldiers tied behind their backs, under the command of a cumbersome U.N. bureaucracy, and fighting Somalia because we tried to extend helping hands to the starving people of that far-off land. Mr. President, the United States has no constitutional authority, as I see it, to sacrifice U.S. soldiers to Boutros-Ghali's vision of multilateral peacemaking. Again, I share the view of Senator Byrd that the time to get out is now.

President Clinton's speech, on October 8, 1993, arguing against withdrawal


And make no mistake about it, if we were to leave Somalia tomorrow, other nations would leave, too. Chaos would resume, the relief effort would stop and starvation soon would return. That knowledge has led us to continue our mission. . . .

If we leave them now, those embers will reignite into flames and people will die again. If we stay a short while longer and do the right things, we've got a reasonable chance of cooling off the embers and getting other firefighters to take our place. . .

So, now, we face a choice. Do we leave when the job gets tough or when the job is well done? Do we invite the return of mass suffering or do we leave in a way that gives the Somalis a decent chance to survive? Recently, Gen. Colin Powell said this about our choices in Somalia: "Because things get difficult, you don't cut and run. You work the problem and try to find a correct solution." . . .

So let us finish the work we set out to do. Let us demonstrate to the world, as generations of Americans have done before us, that when Americans take on a challenge, they do the job right.


Sen. John Kerry, Senate floor speech, 10/7/93, supporting Clinton's anti-withdrawal position


But, Mr. President, I must say I have also been jarred by the reactions of many of our colleagues in the U.S. Senate and in the Congress. I am jarred by the extraordinary sense of panic that seems to be rushing through this deliberative body, and by the strident cries for a quick exit, an immediate departure notwithstanding the fact that what we are doing in Somalia does not bear any resemblance to Grenada, to Panama, to Iraq, and most importantly, to Vietnam. . . .

We must recognize that any decision that we make about Somalia is not just a decision to get our troops home. It is not just a decision about looking out for the interests of the United States. There are extraordinary ramifications attached to the choice that we make in the next days in the Congress and in this country. . . .

Mr. President, we are in a situation now where withdrawal would send the wrong signal to Aidid and his supporters. It would encourage other nations to withdraw from the U.N. effort in Somalia and no doubt would result in the total breakdown of the operation and possibly the resumption of the cycle of famine and war which brought the United States and other members of the international community to Somalia in the first place.

Rightly or wrongly, the Bush administration committed us to this operation. We, as a nation, have accepted this responsibility. We should not panic and flee when the going gets rough. If we are going to withdraw, we have an obligation to do so in a responsible manner, in a way that does not undermine the operation or leave the Somali people to a worse fate. I think the President's plan, as currently outlined, will allow us to step aside responsibly.

New York Times article, October 6, 1993, by then-reporter Thomas Friedman


As hundreds of additional United States troops with special weapons and aircraft began heading to Somalia, a wave of hostility toward the widening operation swept Congress. . . . But Mr. Aspin and Mr. Christopher were besieged by skeptical lawmakers, who scorched them with demands for a clear road map for an exit from Somalia, coupled with bitter complaints that the policy goals were unclear or unrealistic.

It is not clear whether the critics can assemble sufficient votes to pass a law requiring Mr. Clinton to stop the operation. But Congressional anxiety, already high, has been fueled by a wave of constituents' telephone calls reflecting outrage over the prospect of a new hostage crisis, and television pictures of Somali crowds dragging a dead American servicemen through the streets. . . .

Mr. Christopher said the United States wanted to withdraw its forces when possible, "but not before our job is done of providing some security."


New York Times, October 6, 1993


A wave of hostility toward the military operation in Somalia swept Congress today, forcing the White House to send two Cabinet secretaries to Capitol Hill to try to calm critics and plead for additional time to formulate a new policy.

"It's Vietnam all over again," said Senator Ernest F. Hollings, Democrat of South Carolina, who is in a group of conservatives calling for quick withdrawal from Somalia. . . .

Mr. McCain, a prisoner of war in the Vietnam War, said of Mohammed Farah Aidid, who has been blamed for attacks on United Nations peacekeepers: "We should tell Mr. Aidid that we want the Americans back. Otherwise he will pay sooner or later. Then we should come home."


As always, no matter how many times it occurs, it is truly disturbing how there seems to be no limit on the false propaganda and rank historical revisionism which can be disseminated by this administration and its followers and uncorrected by our national media.

Stop lying GOP, it's not helping your cause.

Comments
on Oct 02, 2006
Glad you changed your title.  Much more accurate description than the first one.
on Oct 02, 2006
i agree guy,,,,i put that up before writing....then forgot about it when my youngest distracted me and i posted it...meant to change it before posting....then i changed it without correcting my spelling of somalia (i have this bad habit of spelling it "somolia" for some unknown reason) ...but such is life, lol

on Oct 02, 2006

A better title should be:

"SOME Republicans DID want withdrawal from Somalia AFTER retaliating".

From your article:

Mr. McCain, a prisoner of war in the Vietnam War, said of Mohammed Farah Aidid, who has been blamed for attacks on United Nations peacekeepers: "We should tell Mr. Aidid that we want the Americans back. Otherwise he will pay sooner or later. Then we should come home."

If you had watched Clinton's interview, it was pretty clear that he was arguing that Republicans (in general) wanted a hasty retreat from Somalia after Black Hawk down and that HE, not they, kept thei military there an extra 6 months.

The REALITY, is that Republicans were increasingly unhappy with Somalia (for much the same reasons they were unhappy with being in Kosovo or Bosnia or Haiti) was because it was a nation building excercise. AFTER the attack, Republicans wanted to take out Aidid in retribution along with the other warlords and THEN leave.  McCain's position is much more representative.

 

on Oct 02, 2006
drag,,,do you misread everything? that is hardly what mccain is saying. mccain was saying that we should tell adid what we want, regardless of how he feels, and if he fights us, he will pay. then, regardless of what he thinks, we should come home immediately. you'll probably disagree with that, but hey, that's what you do...

and i think the way the GOP looks at "the party position" is by the leadership's statements (like how everything harry reid or nancy pelosi say or don't say is the "dem position" according to the portable punditry)

GOP Minority Leader Sen. Robert Dole, Senate speech, October 5, 1993


I think it is clear to say from the meeting we had earlier with--I do not know how many Members were there--45, 50 Senators and half the House of Representatives, that the administration is going to be under great pressure to bring the actions in Somalia to a close
.

the one place i may have overstepped is calling it a GOP thing exclusively in the heading. more accurately, in hindsight, i should have said conservatives. primarily it was GOP conservatives, but did include some democratic conservatives like Sen. Byrd.
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